Search Results

Pages About sentencing Information for victims Trial outcomes What happens at a sentencing hearing? Which court will a case be heard in? About guidelines You Be The Judge Sentencing basics Types of sentence Discharges Fines Community sentences Custodial sentences Suspended sentences Determinate prison sentences Extended sentences Life sentences Ancillary orders Other orders made on sentencing Criminal Courts Charge What is the victim surcharge?…

…View related documents on burglary offences here. The definitive guideline on burglary offences was issued on 13 October 2011 and came into force on 16 January 2012. The consultation on the draft guideline on burglary offences was open from 12 May 2011 to 4 August 2011. There were 460 responses received. The following offences are included in the definitive guideline: Aggravated burglary. Domestic burglary. Non-domestic burglary….

2016/2017 April 2016 01/04/2016 Robbery definitive guideline comes into force May 2016 12/05/2016 19/05/2016 Sentencing of youths consultation published Magistrates’ Court Sentencing Guidelines consultation published July 2016 01/07/2016 Dangerous dog offences definitive guideline comes into force August 2016 03/08/2016 11/08/2016 Sentencing of youths consultation closes Magistrates’ Court Sentencing Guidelines consultation closes…

Try sentencing for yourself by going to You Be The Judge online. You Be The Judge puts you in the judge’s seat. You will get to choose from eight real life court cases, you will hear the facts of the case, and the aggravating and mitigating factors, then you will decide the sentence. Finally you get to see how your sentence compares to the one handed out by the judge in the real case.   Guidelines used in You Be The Judge cases Burglary

Imprisonment is the most severe sentence available to the courts. Custodial sentences are reserved for the most serious offences and are imposed when the offence committed is “so serious that neither a fine alone nor a community sentence can be justified for the offence” (section 152(2) of the Criminal Justice Act 2003). A custodial sentence may also be imposed where the court believes it is necessary to protect the public. The length of the…

“The factors taken into account in each case will vary depending upon the facts.” In addition to having regard to the five purposes of sentencing, a judge or magistrate will use sentencing guidelines, which set out the process they should follow and the factors they should consider, to work out the appropriate sentence. For each crime there is a range of sentences available and the judge or magistrates have to decide which type of sentence is…

There are a number of different bodies, in addition to the Sentencing Council, who have a role to play in sentencing. Click above for a simplified diagram of the criminal justice system These include: Judiciary Parliament The Parole Board Probation Service Youth Offending Teams Crown Prosecution Service Ministry of Justice Judiciary Judges and magistrates have a key role in sentencing, being the ones who actually pass sentences, deciding on the…

The way sentencing works can be confusing and many people are unclear as to why offenders get the sentences they do and how those sentences are served. Here are some facts and explanations: Are sentences getting softer and fewer people being sent to prison? Do criminals get out of prison early without serving their full sentence? Do criminals who aren’t jailed just walk free from court? Are judges out of touch? Does a life sentence last for…

View related documents on theft offences here. The definitive guideline on theft offences was issued on 6 October 2015 and came into force on 1 February 2016. The consultation on the draft guideline on theft offences was open from 3 April to 26 June 2014. There were 92 responses received. There are guidelines for offences included within the following sections: General theft Theft from a shop or stall Handling stolen goods Going equipped for…

While all criminal cases begin in magistrates’ courts, some offences can only be tried in the Crown Court, some can only be heard at magistrates’ courts and others can be heard in either. The seriousness of the offence will dictate whether the case will remain in a magistrates’ court from start to finish, or will be referred up to the Crown Court. Types of offences and where they can be tried In terms of deciding in which court a…