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In reports about crimes where money or property are taken, “theft”, “burglary” and “robbery” are terms often used interchangeably. There are, however, very clear differences between these offences. Put very simply, someone is guilty of robbery if he steals from a person using force or makes them think force will be used. Theft means taking someone’s property but does not involve the use of force. Burglary means illegally entering a property in…

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Press releases  — 

Today the Sentencing Council is publishing a new definitive guideline for the sentencing of burglars. The guideline reinforces current sentencing practice, which means that offenders burgling people’s homes can expect a custodial sentence. Sentencing will remain at existing levels, and the guideline aims to ensure that the effect on victims is at the centre of considerations about what sentence each offender should receive. When sentencing…

Press releases  — 

Today, the Sentencing Council is launching a three-month public consultation on its proposals to introduce a new guideline for judges and magistrates on the sentences for all offences which involve burglary. The draft guideline reinforces current sentencing practice, which means that offenders committing domestic burglaries can expect a custodial sentence. It does not propose any reduction in sentences for burglars. The proposals will bring…

Publication  —  Consultations  — 

A consultation paper for a legal professional audience on the sentencing of burglary offences . Closed on 4 August 2011.

…View related documents on burglary offences here. The definitive guideline on burglary offences was issued on 13 October 2011 and came into force on 16 January 2012. The consultation on the draft guideline on burglary offences was open from 12 May 2011 to 4 August 2011. There were 460 responses received. The following offences are included in the definitive guideline: Aggravated burglary. Domestic burglary. Non-domestic burglary….

Triable either way (except as noted below)Maximum: 14 years’ custodyOffence range: Community order – 6 years’ custody This is a serious specified offence for the purposes of section 226A (extended sentence for certain violent, sexual or terrorism offences) of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 if it was committed with intent to: inflict grievous bodily harm on a person, or do unlawful damage to a building or anything in it. This offence is…

Publication  —  Statistical bulletin  — 

A bulletin explaining current sentencing practice for burglary offences describing the context in which the consultation proposals were made.

Triable either way (except as noted below)Maximum: 10 years’ custodyOffence range: Fine – 5 years’ custody This is a serious specified offence for the purposes of section 226A (extended sentence for certain violent, sexual or terrorism offences) of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 if it was committed with intent to: inflict grievous bodily harm on a person, or do unlawful damage to a building or anything in it. This offence is indictable only…

Publication  —  Guideline assessment  — 

Assessments of the impact of the burglary offences definitive guideline.